AlamogordoTownNews.com Free Workshop for Caregivers—brought to you by Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

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AlamogordoTownNews.com Free Workshop for Caregivers—brought to you by Rural Dementia Caregiver Project

Do you take care of someone with memory loss and live in a rural area? Have recent months left you stressed and isolated?

The University of California, San Francisco is offering a free online workshop to help rural caregivers. The project is funded by the National Institutes of Health.

The workshop includes training on how to reduce stress, manage the difficult behaviors of your friend or family member with memory loss, and plan for the future. You will also get support from other caregivers and trained staff.

Because it is online, the workshop is accessible to caregivers whenever they want it, day or night, accessed on computer, tablet or smartphone.

Caregivers are eligible if they live in a rural area, care for someone with memory loss, have internet access, and provide care for at least 10 hours per week. Those who participate will be asked to complete four surveys on their caregiving experiences and will receive up to $80 in cash.

Millions of rural caregivers provide crucial support to family members or friends living with memory loss and dementia. These same caregivers often feel stressed and isolated. An online workshop may help them.

The University of California, San Francisco is conducting a study of a new online caregiver workshop. The project is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Caregivers may qualify if they:

• Live in a rural area Alamogordo is prequalified • Care for someone with memory loss• Are 18 years of age or older• Provide care for at least 10 hours per week

Caregivers who participate in the study of the workshop will be asked to complete four surveys on their caregiving experiences and will receive up to $80 in cash for doing so.

What does the online workshop offer?

The workshop is accessible to rural caregivers whenever they want it, day or night. It teaches caregivers new skills to reduce their stress, take better care of themselves, manage challenging behaviors of their care partners, and plan for the future. Caregivers also get a workbook to keep, support from other caregivers, and information on community resources.

How can caregivers and others learn more?

Interested caregivers can go to caregiverproject.ucsf.edu or call the toll-free number 1-833-634-0603 to get more information. Organizations that work in rural communities or have contact with caregivers can use that same contact information.

Note:

“I expect that the study may be relevant to many of your readers and hope that it will be an interesting opportunity for them, as well.

To date we have enrolled over 300 caregivers from across the country, with room for many more. We would appreciate your support with getting the word out in your area of New Mexico.

For more information about the study, please visit our website at https://caregiverproject.ucsf.edu/

I look forward to hearing from you, and please let me know if you have any questions. If you'd like to speak by phone, my number is 415-514-3355.

Best regards,


Maritza Luzanilla 

Clinical Research CoordinatorUCSF Division of General Internal Medicine490 Illinois Street, 9119 | San Francisco, CA 94158 tel: 415.514.3355 | maritza.luzanilla@ucsf.ed

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